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Home » Archives » April 2005 » Japan's Train Crash: Your Reaction

Japan's Train Crash: Your Reaction

Friday, April 29, 2005 Posted: 09:43 AM JST

Did you witness the Amagasaki crash? Do you usually use that train line? Do you know people who use it? Has it shocked or frightened you? Are you frustrated because of the lack of information about the victims in English (or other languages)? Do you have an opinion? Please click on the comment link below to send us your comments.

Keywords: opinion_item

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3 comments so far post your own

1 | At 08:45pm on Apr 29 2005, Patrick Coelen wrote:
I am using the same train line every morning on my way to work (30 minutes before the train accident).
It is just too unreal that such an accident happens on my regular train line. I just did not realize the scale of it all until watching the news later on.
After moving about half a year ago I have been using this JR Fukuchiyama train and I have to say that I was surprised that my regular train in the morning rush quite often arrives late. Japanese trains are quite famous for running on time but this train line is often delayed for a few minutes. Has JR been challenging the limits?
Has JR given speed priority over safety as a result of competition? JR is directly competing with the private Hankyu train line which also has a train line running on a similar route between Takarazuka and Osaka. Hankyu trains are not that fast with more stations, but they are always on time. JR has fewer stations, and is running on a higher speed. JR also has hardly any curves and the first curve is right there where the accident occurred. I prefer Hankyu, but in the morning on the way to work every minute counts so as a daily commuter my choice was JR. This has turned out to be a quite dangerous choice.
JR will now probably upgrade the Fukuchiyama train line to all the latest security standards, but it is just too bad that an accident had to occur first.
2 | At 02:32pm on May 02 2005, Phil Ono wrote:
I hope this national tragedy will help reform JR's ways. But ultimately we are all partially responsible. We all want to travel faster and on time. This puts pressure on JR which in turn puts pressure on its employees pushing the limits. My condolences to the people who died and those directly affected.
3 | At 02:46am on May 04 2005, Suzano wrote:
Yeah I use to take that train but when i got a car that changed. when i heard of this i was so sad. i hope the families of the dead and injuried are doing well.

Suzano
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